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Wizard Radio Media - Politics

Hyer’s Highlights: Should misogyny be a hate crime?

7th November 2018 | Politics

Hyer’s Highlights: Should misogyny be a hate crime?

Hate crime describes an act “motivated by racial, sexual or other prejudice, typically one involving violence”.

Back in September, the government announced that it will consider whether to recognise misogyny and street harassment of women as a hate crime, in a move hailed as an “amazing” victory by anti-sexism campaigners. But Sara Thornton, chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, has recently warned that the police are too stretched to take on all issues. She said that while “treating misogyny as a hate crime is a concern for some well-organised campaigning organisations”, her forces simply “do not have the resources to do everything”.


Thornton’s sentiments have been echoed by Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service Cressida Dick, who has claimed that focusing on classifying misogyny as a hate crime and recording incidents of it is diverting attention away from bigger priorities. She added that officers should not have to deal with reports of misogyny and it should not be a criminal offence either, calling for her force to focus instead on “core policing”.

Discussing whether misogyny should become a hate crime (and therefore handled by the police) on Benji Hyer's Sunday radio show, listener Olivia messaged in to explain how “the lines are too blurred when it comes to some forms of misogyny”, and therefore it should not be down to the police to decide on a subjective matter.

Broadcasted exclusively worldwide on W!ZARD Radio Station.

Benji Hyer on whether Misogyny should be a Hate Crime

Benji Hyer responds to listener Olivia on whether misogyny should be classified as a hate crime in the UK. (2 minutes)



Listen to the full discussion from Benji Hyer's radio show on the 'Hyer's Highlights' podcast, here

Hyer's Highlights: The darkness in America

31st October 2018 | Politics

Hyer's Highlights: The darkness in America

The past week in the United States have been dark:

Two people were killed at a grocery store minutes after their shooter tried to enter an African American church.
Mail bombs were delivered to prominent Trump critics
and then on the Sabbath, 11 Jews were murdered in cold blood whilst praying at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.


Donald Trump tweeted that "a very big part of the anger we see today in our society is caused by the purposely false and inaccurate reporting of the Mainstream Media." Yet most of those on the receiving end of the bombs have featured repeatedly in Trump’s tweets or rally speeches, more often than not in a negative light, and an apparent spark for deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the history of the United States was a racist hoax inflamed by a President in the run up to the Mid-term elections.

On Benji Hyer's radio show, we asked how the recent spout of rage can be taken out of politics. However, one listener, Mario, pointed out that society is actually no different to how it was before, and it is merely the presence of social media which is bringing to light these despicable sentiments.

Broadcasted exclusively worldwide on W!ZARD Radio Station.

Benji Hyer on the darkness in America

Benji Hyer responds to listener Mario who points out hat society is no different to how it was before, but social media brings light to even more news stories. (4 minutes)



Listen to the full discussion from Benji Hyer's radio show on the 'Hyer's Highlights' podcast, here

Hyer’s Highlights: How do you solve a border like Ireland?

31st October 2018 | Politics

Hyer’s Highlights: How do you solve a border like Ireland?

British Prime Minister Theresa May has told MPs that 95% of the terms of Brexit have been agreed with the EU... but the issue of the Irish border is still a "considerable sticking point".

The issue of the Irish border is a complicated one - with the Republic of Ireland on one side of the border being in the EU, but Northern Ireland (as part of the UK) leaving the EU, it could make trade and transport difficult if there is a "hard border". Beyond that, before the Good Friday agreement in 1998, the border was riddled with violence and tension over the way the two Ireland's would work together.


The EU Parliament's chief Brexit negotiator, Guy Verhofstadt, issued a stark warning last week to Theresa May, saying that if there is no solution for the Irish border, then zero percent of Brexit is completed.

On his Sunday radio show, Benji Hyer outlined the complicated nature of the Irish border, and responds to Scott’s message, which argued that the border issue “is an almost impossible trial" which will probably be "the reason why a Brexit deal isn’t signed” in time.

Broadcasted exclusively worldwide on W!ZARD Radio Station.

Benji Hyer on the Irish Border

Benji Hyer responds to listener Scott and outlines the complicated nature of the Irish border. (4 minutes)



Listen to the full discussion from Benji Hyer's radio show on the 'Hyer's Highlights' podcast, here