Off Air
Wizard Radio Media - BFI London Film Festival 2015

Review: Steve Jobs

22nd October 2015 | BFI London Film Festival 2015

Review: Steve Jobs
"The musicians play the instruments; I play the orchestra..."

The world’s friendliest smartphones. Creative computers. Millions of songs in our pockets.

Steve Jobs truly revolutionised the technological landscape that we live in today, so it’s easy to imagine why creating a film about him may be met with initial hesitation.

Apple fanboys are notoriously some of the most dedicated users in the world. Known for queuing up round the corner just to get the latest release before anyone else, this attraction (and Apple’s attention to detail) have caused many people to leave the Steve Jobs project – including David Fincher (initially enrolled to direct the film), Christian Bale, Leo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and Bradley Cooper. In the end, it was down to Aaron Sorkin, Danny Boyle and Michael Fassbender to lead the parade.

Unlike previous films about Jobs (namely Ashton Kutcher’s biopic in 2013), this release focuses on three major keynotes in Jobs’ career (launch of the Macintosh, launch of NeXT and the launch of the iMac in 1998) with major plot points being introduced within the 40 minutes prior to the keynotes. As unrealistic as it may seem, many of the storylines are historically accurate (Sorkin hired Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak to aid with accuracy) and, as Sorkin and Boyle recalled many times during the film’s Press Conference, this release is a dramatization rather than a biopic.

Sorkin is known for his quick style, with long tracking shots and intense dialogue between characters. Jobs is no different, with Sorkin pulling off his master skill at writing, creating dialogue which is truly believable. This, mixed with Boyle’s creative directing (managing to mix actual scenes with stock footage and emotional visualisations in a way which many other directors could only dream of) makes…

Review: Sherpa

12th October 2015 | BFI London Film Festival 2015

Review: Sherpa
Mount Everest is known internationally as the tallest mountain in the world. It’s fearing and deadly and only a select list of names have managed to reach the ‘holy land’ – Everest’s summit. However, for every man who attempts such a feat, there is a team of Sherpa’s ahead of them preparing the way.

Sherpa is truly groundbreaking documentary by Universal Pictures and Discovery Channel. It tells the story of the Sherpas, an ethnic group living on the north side of Everest (Nepal) who both worship Everest (they call it, “Chomolungma”) and train their entire lives to work on the mountain – acting as guides, climbing supporters or porters.

But, in recent years, there has been a change in the waters and tension has been created between the Sherpa’s and foreign tourist climbers.

Jennifer Peedom’s truly fascinating documentary seemed to start recording just in time – a few days before one of the mountain’s deadliest avalanches, in which sixteen Sherpa’s died. As someone who had set out to produce a documentary investigating the deteriorating relationship between Sherpa’s and westerners, she couldn’t have picked a greater time.

Sherpa is thought-provoking, to say the least. One of the first times westerners are able to, hands on, see the effect of climate change and how it is (literally) ending lives in rural Nepal.

Review: Paulina

12th October 2015 | BFI London Film Festival 2015

Review: Paulina
Paulina is an Argentinian film starring Dolores Fonzi, Oscar Martinez and Esteban Lamothe.

The film follows Paulina (Dolores Fonzi), a trainee lawyer who ditches her studies to teach in a remote town in Paraguay, as she fights between her ethics and practicalities and the many challenges that face her – including one specific brutal attack which changes everything.

Santiago Mitre presents a truly compelling and engaging battle in Paulina, exploring the harsh realities of a young woman trying to ‘follow her dreams’. It’s a fight of pragmatism versus dreams and belief.

Whilst it’s only for a select audience (and, the foreign language may cause confusion at times), those that are interested in a morally complex, nuanced film should definitely visit Paulina.